A cotton scarf by any other name…

I found this link in my Gmail web clip queue. I thought to myself, hm, this scarf looks an awful lot like another scarf I’ve seen.

It’s a jersey knit scarf. T-shirt material. 15$ or 85$. You tell me.

Not to mention the fact that American Apparel sells 35$ t-shirts. And even they sell the scarves for that much cheaper. They come in a three-pack for less than half the price of one of the more expensive ones.

Not only that, American Apparel scarf comes with a video. Showing different ways to wear the scarf. A scarf with an instructional video. A modular scarf. Awesome.

Hornet in bed.

The cat was in my room last night. She’s not supposed to be there, my allergies have gotten bad enough that any fur on the bed can aggravate it quite severely. But, she manages to get under the bed, far out of reach, and wait it out until long after the door has been closed and then make her way around the room causing all sorts of annoying trouble, most of which involves making as much noise as possible.

Last night, she found something fun to toss around and chucked it up onto the bed, which if course woke me up. She dashed off before I was able to catch her, but she woke me up enough that I decided on a visit to the loo. While within, I felt something on my arm and brushed it off. It fluttered across the room and started drunkenly walking it’s yellow and black striped butt up the door.

Given the situation, I had to sit and watch it for a couple of minutes. A harrowing couple of minutes hoping the thing would continue it’s slow wobbly trek to the ceiling.

It did, I found a box to smack it, everything was well again.

However, I then spent next 4 hours convinced that any little irritation on my skin was another hornet. Good times.

Incidentally…

Evidently, there may have been a bear. Matt has provided some possible proof. It also may have pierced the boat. This issue could not be solved with a paddle. That is, of course, unless it was an exactly paddle sized hole. But that chance is exactly one in a million…
Kitty written, Matthias approved:

Water always flows in a particular direction.

Something struck me last night about the phrase “up a creek without a paddle,” and strangely enough, one of my professors used it today in class.

The phrase is used as a euphemism for a situation that is less than satisfactory. In other words, you’re fucked. The context is established as negative. Therefore “up a creek” implies being at a location at which you would rather not be, and would therefore imply, logically speaking, that you would rather be down a creek.

Water flows downstream.Something struck me last night about the phrase “up a creek without a paddle,” and strangely enough, one of my professors used it today in class.

The phrase is used as a euphemism for a situation that is less than satisfactory. In other words, you’re fucked. The context is established as negative. Therefore “up a creek” implies being at a location at which you would rather not be, and would therefore imply, logically speaking, that you would rather be down a creek.

Water flows downstream.

Getting from up a creek to down a creek would therefore involve sitting back and letting gravity and nature do the work. The only reason you might need a paddle is for steering purposes, I suppose, in the event that it was a rocky creek or a winding creek. But then there is the fact that “creek” is defined as a “stream, brook or minor tributary to a river,” and while such a thing could be rocky or winding, it does not bring to mind the likelihood of being very fast flowing. You could simply reach out and push yourself away from a protruding rock or off of a sandy bank on the edge of a curve.

I would suppose, then, that I would rather enjoy being up a creek without a paddle. It would allow for some relaxation and time to enjoy the scenery around me, rather than getting a rather extensive workout paddling up the creek against the current.

Though, if you weren’t paying attention, you might be lost in watching nature and not realise that you’ve come upon a waterfall. But to have come upon a waterfall, you would still have had to have floated from up the creek to down the creek, and once again… It is not the up the creek part in which the lack of the paddle was a problem. It’s the down the creek part where you’ll likely think that the decision not to turn around when you left home for the the trip in the first place, remembered that you forgot to pack the paddle, and figured, Hey. Who needs a paddle.
Getting from up a creek to down a creek would therefore involve sitting back and letting gravity and nature do the work. The only reason you might need a paddle is for steering purposes, I suppose, in the event that it was a rocky creek or a winding creek. But then there is the fact that “creek” is defined as a “stream, brook or minor tributary to a river,” and while such a thing could be rocky or winding, it does not bring to mind the likelihood of being very fast flowing. You could simply reach out and push yourself away from a protruding rock or off of a sandy bank on the edge of a curve.

I would suppose, then, that I would rather enjoy being up a creek without a paddle. It would allow for some relaxation and time to enjoy the scenery around me, rather than getting a rather extensive workout paddling up the creek against the current.

Though, if you weren’t paying attention, you might be lost in watching nature and not realise that you’ve come upon a waterfall. But to have come upon a waterfall, you would still have had to have floated from up the creek to down the creek, and once again… It is not the up the creek part in which the lack of the paddle was a problem. It’s the down the creek part where you’ll likely think that the decision not to turn around when you left home for the the trip in the first place, remembered that you forgot to pack the paddle, and figured, Hey. Who needs a paddle.